September 29th 2019: John Funnell

John Funnell-sept19Luke 19:1-10

Winter is coming. Christmas is near. Some people love Christmas. We all know the story of A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. I haven’t read the book, but have seen the film. To me, Ebenezer Scrooge is Michael Caine! He was a wealthy, yet tight-fisted man. He treated Bob Cratchit and his family very badly. Through various ghostly and spiritual influences, Scrooge miraculously turns into a wonderful philanthropist. Everyone is happy. It’s a classic tale.

Many people see this story as quite similar to the story of Zacchaeus. Jesus turns a wealthy tax collector into a nice, generous person who gives half of what he earns to the poor. However, such a simplistic interpretation doesn’t do it justice. It limits us to read it as part of the crowd, who see Zacchaeus as a known sinner (verse 7). Once Jesus gets involved he becomes a generous Christian.

Viewing this story from the perspective of the crowd is limiting. Step back from the crowd and stop being simply a spectator. What truly matters is the viewpoint of Jesus, looking at this through Jesus’ eyes.

Jesus ignores the crowd. They swarm around Him yet He goes straight for the man in the tree. Why Zacchaeus? Dr. Luke provides us with many clues why. The crowds ‘pressed onto Jesus’. Why? Because they had heard God in flesh was there. To them, Jesus was an A-Lister celebrity. Zacchaeus was one of the people who wanted to see Jesus. Yet he had a problem; he was too short and couldn’t see over the heads of the crowd. His view is blocked. The detail of him being short didn’t need to be added. There must be a reason Dr. Luke added it to the narrative.

The Greek word for ‘short’ is interesting. It is not just used to describe height but also age. In John 19 we read of the blind man who was healed by Jesus. The Pharisees were not happy. His parents were called into court to be quizzed. Yet his parents say he is of age and can answer for himself. The same Greek word for age is used as to describe short. We see this again in Hebrews 11:11 when Sarah is described as beyond child-bearing age. It’s the same Greek word again. Dr. Luke adds the adjective ‘short’ because Zacchaeus was short but also because the word describes his status, especially in a society where age and status matter in a community. Dr. Luke added it not just to explain why he couldn’t see, but also to show Zacchaeus has a lowly status in his community. Zacchaeus’ ultimate problem was not his height but his family and friends had flocked to see Jesus and had left him behind. That’s the tragedy that sits behind the narrative. Zacchaeus was left behind by his community, abandoned by friends and family. He had no status. He was lost. Zacchaeus was all alone and without a loving community to guide him. Perhaps this is why he went down the wrong path and became a tax collector to Rome?

He climbed a fig tree – a symbol of prosperity. Fig leaves are a symbol of covering sin. Zacchaeus is trying to rise above. Jesus finds him in his sin, lonely, hiding up a fig tree. ‘And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, hurry and come down, for I must stay at your house today.”’ (Luke 19:5). Jesus calls out to Zacchaeus by name. He calls him down and reconciles him with his community. Jesus makes a public statement that he is a son of Abraham. He tells the crowd he is one of them. Zacchaeus is restored. Hallelujah!

‘And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham.”’ (Luke 19:9).

 Jesus can come into the life of any person who has been outcast and left out by his community. He can bring them back into his community. This is a story about Christ, come into the world, coming to seek the lost. Hallelujah! “For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost.” (Luke 19:10)

As Jesus was walking down the street He didn’t see what the crowd saw, He saw a broken man, trying to lift himself above his community, yet hiding. So Jesus came and He personally called him by name. And what did He do? He loved him. For the first time in a long time Zacchaeus knew he was loved. We see repentance. He gave half of his possessions to the poor. Zacchaeus gave freely and joyfully because He knew the overwhelming and overflowing love of Christ. Friends, the good news, the best news, is that Jesus’ love can do the same for us today.

If you have times when you feel low, exhausted, ashamed, overwhelmed, convicted by the weight of your sin, please know that Jesus is here for you. He will never ignore you for the crowd. He will call you by name. He’ll say, ‘My dear brother, my dear sister, ‘I love you.’ The creator of all time, space and matter says, ‘I love you.’ He says, ‘Come down from the tree of tiredness and shame, come down to your community, your church. I don’t care about your past, what anyone else thinks of you, I just want you. All that shame I buried at the cross.’

The call today to Christians and both non-Christians alike is ‘will you come down from your hiding place and take Jesus home with you, just like Zacchaeus? Will you let Jesus transform your life with His love? Today, salvation has come to the home. Will you take it?

Contact The Elderly – 3rd June 2017

We had a glorious sunshine afternoon when we held our first Contact the Elderly UK tea yesterday. One guest commented, “I’ve been to the Ritz for tea and this was better!” It was wonderful to be joined by senior citizens from the community. Thanks to all the helpers – drivers, bakers, hosts … you were wonderful. We are all looking forward to the next one. 🙂

Contact The Elderly – 1st October 2017

Yesterday we had a wonderful time at our Contact the Elderly UK Afternoon Tea  We enjoyed delicious homemade savouries and scrumptious cakes 🍰 Ian Middlemist spoke on the importance of keeping in contact with the community we are placed in – just as Jesus was part of the community He lived in. At the end of the afternoon the senior citizens were all given Harvest gifts of fruit and vegetables 🍐🍊🌽🥒 

September 24th 2017 (noon): John Funnell

John Funnell - Sept 17II Kings 4:1-7

The woman had nothing left. Creditors were coming to take her boys as payment for the debt. Think about the poor woman – her husband was dead, she was in debt, her boys were about to be taken.

‘Now the wife of one of the sons of the prophets cried to Elisha, “Your servant my husband is dead, and you know that your servant feared the LORD, but the creditor has come to take my two children to be his slaves.”’ (II Kings 4:1). The woman cried out to Elisha – God’s man on the ground. Have you got an Elisha in your life you can turn to? Are you an Elisha? Can someone in the community turn to you in a crisis? As a church we are a family – bound by the love of a family, bound by the blood of Christ. Our churches need to regain the community’s home. We need to become the Elisha of Roch in our work, for our neighbours.  Also, we need to become the Elisha for each other. Have gospel love at the heart of your church. You’ll never need gimmicks, be driven by gospel-centered life, by God’s word. Be a place where people are happy to come to at all times.

The love of God will draw people in. That’s what evangelism is. We don’t offer what the world offers. As a church our priority in our community is to be an Elisha. How should we respond to people who cry out to us? The widow is in the time of greatest need. Elisha asks her what she has. Interesting. He reminds her to look back at how God has blessed her. Initially she says she has nothing, then pauses and says she has a little oil. We too have a little oil. Don’t let the stresses of life control us, cloud our view of what God has done for us. Humanly speaking, the church is dying in Wales – empty pews, people not interested. We must not forget our responsibility to thank God, to thank Him for the little oil we have.                                   

It was only God who could pay this woman’s debt. It was only when she could totally rely on Him in faith that God poured out His grace to her. When we realise we are incapable of saving ourselves, He will pour it His Spirit to you. Whatever doubts and anxieties you carry, God’s merciful Spirit will never dry out, just take your empty jars to Him. Pray in desperation, knowing that without God we have nothing. 

Do your neighbours know you go to church every week? If they don’t know, they won’t come to you in times of need. People have stopped coming to church.  We need to become the Elisha of our community. We must acknowledge the facilities we have, remain responsible for the pot of oil we have.  We must go forward in faith and He will pour out all we need.

2 Kings 4-2